Making a Tage Frid-Style Stool: Time to Drill Holes for the Legs

With the seat, seat extension and their joinery ready to go from my last installment, it’s time to focus on drilling holes for the legs of our Tage Frid-style three-legged stool. There are two major tasks to accomplish when making the seat: cutting 1” holes to join the legs and shaping the curve of the seat. Since the seat blank is still square, I’ll focus on drilling the holes first and work on shaping the seat in the next blog post. woodworking tips and techniques woodworking tricks

seat extension for stool

STEP 1: CUTTING HOLES TO ACCEPT THE LEGS

The legs of this three-legged stool are joined at compound angles. If you were looking straight at the stool, you’d see the front legs pitched forward, which is called the rake, and to the sides, which is called the splay. The complicated part of drilling these holes is that you have to incorporate both angles at the same time. In his book Tage Frid Teaches Woodworking (1985, The Taunton Press), Tage Frid describes making a jig for his drill press to drill these holes at the proper angles. My drill press doesn’t allow me to tilt the table, so I had to improvise a bit. woodworking tips and techniques woodworking tricks

STEP 2: ESTABLISH THE RAKE AND SPLAY ANGLES

First, the drawings in the book indicate the back leg is at a 72-degree angle, which is the rake angle. The front legs are splayed at about 78 degrees. To simplify matters, I established both the rake and the splay at 75 degrees, a good compromise. These angles aren’t exactly what Frid chose, but they are close enough for my purposes  woodworking tips and techniques woodworking tricks

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